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HP Elite Book 2730p Business Tablet PC

August 19, 2009 Leave a comment

HP introduces the new EliteBook 2730p tablet PC for business users. The 2730p is the successor of the 2710p.
Specs and features are mostly the same as the other EliteBooks (Intel Core 2 Duo ULV, SSD option, HP business and security stuff like the biz card reader, encryption and DriveGuard).
The 2730p tablet has a 12-inch touch screen display with 1280×800 resolution, WiFi 802.11a/b/g/draft-n, a SD card slot, and Bluetooth.

Buyers may want to get 80GB SSD instead of hard drive and they can get the optional EVDO/HSPA mobile broadband module, and optional 2 Megapixel webcam.
If you want to buy the  EliteBook 2730p tablet PC, you can check all the HP Elite Books Available on Amazon , compare the prices, and then take the best decision that suits your needs.

Intel Xeon ‘Nehalem-EX’ Processor Presented by Intel

August 19, 2009 Leave a comment

A new Intel® Xeon® processor codenamed “Nehalem-EX” has been revealed by Intel. Being able to deliver a number of new technical advancements and boost enterprise computing performance, the processor will be running the next generation of intelligent and expandable high-end Intel server platforms.

The Nehalem-EX processor, being ready to enter production later this year, will feature up to eight cores inside a single chip supporting 16 threads and 24MB of cache. Offering the highest-ever jump from a previous generation processor, its performance increase will be dramatic.

New reliability, availability and serviceability (RAS) features usually found in the company’s Intel® Itanium processor family, such as Machine Check Architecture (MCA) Recovery will be available with Nehalem-EX.

the new Nehalem-EX processor, being ideal for virtualized applications, server consolidation, data demanding enterprise applications and technical computing environments, will be able to boost up to nine times the memory bandwidth of the previous-generation Intel Xeon 7400 platform, also doubling the memory capacity with up to 16 memory slots per processor socket, and offering four high-bandwidth QuickPath Interconnect links. Without the need for third-party chips to “glue” the platform together, Nehalem-EX will provide tremendous scalability, from large-memory two-socket systems through eight-socket systems capable of processing 128 threads simultaneously, while, with third-party solutions, additional scalability options including greater sockets counts will also be possible.

Some of the main advantages of Nehalem-EX are:

* Intel Nehalem Architecture built on Intel’s unique 45nm high-k metal gate technology process
* Up to 8 cores per processor
* Up to 16 threads per processor with Intel® Hyper-threading
* Scalability up to eight sockets via Quick Path Interconnects and greater with third-party node controllers
* QuickPath Architecture with four high-bandwidth links
* Integrated memory controllers
* 24MB of shared cache
* Intel Turbo Boost Technology
* Intel scalable memory buffer and scalable memory interconnects
* Support for up to 16 memory slots per processor socket
* Up to 9x the memory bandwidth of previous generation
* 2.3 billion transistors
* Advanced RAS capabilities including MCA Recovery

Nehalem-EX, having new RAS capabilities for high-end enterprises, will be able to accelerate IT adoption of Intel-based platforms over RISC-based platforms by delivering a lower total cost of ownership, higher performance, lower electricity bills and the ability to standardize on a flexible IT environment.

claytronics-the future

July 31, 2009 2 comments

About Claytronics

The Appearance of Thought in the Behavior of Machines 

Today, computing engages a user’s senses of sight and hearing through video and audio devices whose effects the user must integrate in his or her mind.  Suppose that electronic media could offer users an active form of original information that would fully integrate sight and sound and add the sense of touch for the user experience.  Suppose that the person using information could interact physically with it.  This is the concept of claytronics, which is also known as programmable matter.  Through this medium, users would engage with information in realistic, 3-dimensional forms — represented in the immediacy of the user’s personal space. 

Creation of claytronics technology is the bold objective of collaborative research between Carnegie Mellon and Intel, which combines nano-robotics and large-scale computing to create synthetic reality, a revolutionary, 3-dimensional display of information.  The vision behind this research is to provide users with tangible forms of electronic information that express the appearance and actions of original sources. 

The objects created from programmable matter will be scalable to life size or larger.  They will be likewise reducible in scale. Such objects will be capable of continuous, 3-D motion.  Representations in programmable matter will offer to the end-user an experience that is indistinguishable from reality.  Claytronic representations will seem so real that users will experience the impression that they are dealing with the original object.

Claytronic emulation of the function, behavior and appearance of individuals, organisms and objects will fully mimic reality – and fulfill a well-known criterion for artificial intelligence formulated by the visionary mathematician and computer science pioneer Alan Turing. 

A Representation of Reality That Passes the ‘Turing Test’

In 1950, in a groundbreaking article, Turing asked “Can Machines Think?”  and offered a criterion to “refute anyone who doubts that a computer can really think.”  His proposal was that “if an observer cannot distinguish the responses of a programmed machine from those of a human being, the machine is said to have passed the Turing Test.”

Although the Turing Test remains a robust source of discussion among those who devote their lives to artificial intelligence, philosophy and cognitive science, claytronics conceives of a technology that will surpass the Turing Test for the appearance of thought in the behaviors of a machine.

The seemingly magical quality of this media is suggested by the Greek word, pario (paree-oh), which means “to make” or “to bring forth,” a transformation of data into delightful forms that will echo the mythical power of the ancient artist Pygmalion whose command brought to life the statue Galatea.

By enabling the representation of tangible, realistic three-dimensional objects across networks, claytronic media — or programmable matter — promise to provide users of digital information with a transforming experience.  To learn more, read this article on programmable matter published in Computer, the IEEE Computer Society Magazine.  Then review the following slides that present the vision of claytronics as this dynamic technology is evolving in the Carnegie Mellon-Intel Claytronics Research Project.

20 High Quality Free WordPress 2.7 Themes

June 1, 2009 2 comments

01 – Elegant Grunge Theme

Elegant Grunge is an unwashed yet crisp WordPress 2.7 theme inspired by wefunction.com.

Elegant Grunge Theme

02 – FREEmium Theme

Highly customizable WordPress theme designed by Paul Kadysz and developed by Dariusz Siedlecki.

FREEmium Theme

03 – Irresistible Theme

Irresistible is a visually-rich personal blog WordPress 2.7 theme, with a little bit of a multimedia focus.

Irresistible Theme

04 – Typogriph Theme

Typogriph is a two-columns theme, with a liquid layout and support for all the features introduced with WordPress 2.7.

Typogriph Theme

05 – The Unstandard Theme

The Unstandard is a split two/three column WordPress 2.7 theme where the home and archive index pages utilize photos rather than text.

The Unstandard Theme

06 – Milano Theme

This is an elegant WordPress theme with unique color combination.

Milano Theme

07 – Simple Balance Theme

Beautiful theme with built-in support for threaded comments.

Simple Balance Theme

08 – Gallery Theme

Designed by Christopher Wallace, Gallery is a beautiful, free, gallery-style theme for WordPress.

Gallery Theme

09 – Simple Paper Theme

Simple Paper comes with a unique design (left-aligned), fixed menu, stylized comments, paginated posts and easily editable CSS.

Simple Paper Theme

10 – Typebased Theme

Typebased is a free, personal WordPress theme, with a very clean and elegant style.

Typebased Theme

11 – Grid Focus Theme

Grid Focus is a three column widget enabled WordPress 2.7+ compatible WordPress theme. The latest update is completely optimized and stripped of any unnecessary code allowing for complete customizability.

Grid Focus Theme

12 – Old School Theme

It is a stylish blue design. This theme represents the future for the Hybrid framework. You must have Hybrid installed to use this theme.

Old School Theme

13 – Undedicated Theme

Undedicated is a free, minimal WordPress theme developed for those who love simplicity.

Undedicated Theme

14 – Equilibrium Theme

Equilibrium WordPress theme is aimed at those who want a clean and simple magazine styled blog.

Equilibrium Theme

15 – WP DashboardLike Theme [ view demo ]

WordPress theme inspired by WordPress 2.7 Dashboard.

WP DashboardLike Theme

16 – Linquist Theme

Linquist is a simple, portfolio oriented theme, without the usual blogging garbage.

Linquist Theme

17 – Magazeen Theme

This beautiful 2-col-theme was designed with the main focus being on typography, grids and magazine-look.

Magazeen Theme

18 – LightWord Theme

Simply clever theme with two columns, right-sidebar, fixed-width and widget-ready. Compatible with WordPress 2.7

LightWord Theme

19 – Hybrid News Theme

This theme is meant to be a theme purely for news site. It has extra widget sections, double navigation menus, drop-down menus, a featured slider, and pretty much anything you’d need to run a complete news site.

Hybrid News Theme

20 – Portfolio WPESP Theme

Portfolio – WPESP Theme is a “minimalist” Theme based on the idea of portfolio created by DAILYWP. The Theme is a starting point in the creation of portfolios, using WordPress as CMS.

Portfolio WPESP Theme

10 reasons Vista haters will love Windows 7

May 25, 2009 1 comment

Many of my friends and readers adamantly refused to make the switch to Windows Vista when it came out. Some who bought new machines with Vista installed immediately “downgraded” the OS. A few proclaimed that they would give up XP only when you pried it from their cold, dead hands. But even in the last category, many of them are impressed with what they’ve seen in the Windows 7 beta.

While some tech pundits are saying 7 isn’t really all that different from Vista — and indeed, one of the attractions for Vista users is that 7 can generally use the same drivers and run the same apps as Vista — the consensus among anti-Vista folks I know who’ve tried the 7 beta seems to be that the new operating system is “Vista done right.”

1: UAC has mellowed out

User Account Control in Vista is like living with an overprotective mother — when you’re 30. It’s constantly popping up to warn you of impending danger, even when you’re just trying to take a look at Device Manager or perform some other innocent task. It hovers over you and nags you constantly: “Are you sure you want to do that?” Like Mom, UAC has our best interests in mind, but it can drive you nuts in the name of “security” — especially when you consider that it doesn’t really define a security boundary.

2: Explorer is no longer a pane in the behind

In a misguided attempt to alleviate the need for horizontal scrolling, Vista made the left navigation pane in Windows Explorer a constantly moving target. As you move your mouse, it will automatically scroll back and forth. My husband calls this auto-scrolling feature the “whack a mole” phenomenon because of the way the contents of the pane seem to dodge back and forth.

You can avoid the auto-scrolling by dragging the pane to make it wide enough to accommodate the entire tree, but that isn’t a good option on a small screen, such as the one on my compact VAIO notebook.

In Windows 7, the navigation pane stays still, so you no longer risk getting seasick from all the swaying back and forth.

3: Graphics cards coexist peacefully once more

In XP, we could use pretty much whatever graphics cards we wanted for multiple monitors. I had a machine with three cards installed: an NVidia, an ATI, and a Matrox. XP would stretch my desktop across all three monitors attached to those cards. When I upgraded that machine to Vista, I found that I no longer had multiple monitors. Some research revealed that to use multiple graphics cards, they would have to all use the same driver. That meant I couldn’t use cards from different vendors together. I had to shell out a few bucks to get more ATI cards before I could use all my monitors again.

According to reports, Windows 7 has added support for multiple heterogeneous graphics cards from different vendors. Now this probably doesn’t mean you can combine ATI and NVIDIA cards in an SLI-configuration, but it sounds as if we can have our multi-vendor multi-monitor setups back.

4: Clutter and bloat are reduced

Vista was perhaps the culmination of Microsoft’s efforts to be all things to all users. Along with the built-in applications we got with XP, Vista added a contacts program, a calendaring program, a photo editing program, and so forth. While some users appreciate all these free applications, many others have been annoyed by the “extras” they don’t need or use. If you’re planning to install Office with Outlook, there’s no need for Contacts and Calendar. And if you have your own favorite and more powerful graphics applications, such as PhotoShop, there’s no need for Photo Gallery. The extras just clutter up your Programs menu and take up space on the hard disk.

With Windows 7, Microsoft has removed a number of the extra programs and now offers them as free downloads from the Windows Live Web site. This way, those who want them can have them, and those who don’t won’t have to deal with removing them.

5: Boot performance is better

Another common complaint about Vista has been the inordinate amount of time it can take to boot up. This might not be an issue for those who leave their systems on all the time, but if you turn off your computer every night, waiting around forever for it to get started in the morning can turn into a major annoyance.

A Microsoft spokesperson indicated that the company’s goal for Windows 7 is a 15-second boot time, whereas three quarters of Vista users report boot times of more than 30 seconds. Although the beta of Win7 may not have achieved that 15-second mark yet for most users, the majority of beta testers I’m hearing from say it’s substantially quicker than Vista on the same hardware. That’s been my personal experience, as well. Since it is still a beta, it’s not unrealistic to hope that continued tweaking will get that time down further before the final release.

6: Notifications can be fine-tuned

In XP and Vista, you can disable the balloon notifications in the system tray, but what if you’d like to continue to get notifications from some applications but not from others? Windows 7 allows you to customize the behavior by simply clicking the little arrow next to the tray and selecting Customize. In the dialog box, choose which icons you want to appear in the tray.For each application, you can select whether you want to display notifications or hide them, as shown in Figure A.

Figure A

Windows 7 gives you much more control over those notifications in the system tray.

7: Security messages are consolidated

In Vista, you have several security-related icons in the system tray, and you might have notifications popping up from each one. To make changes to security settings, you may have to open several applications. In Windows 7, all the security messages have been consolidated into one icon. When you click it, you’ll see all messages related to firewall, Windows Defender, Windows Update settings, and so forth, as shown in Figure B.

Figure B

Windows 7 consolidates all security-related messages in one system tray icon.

By clicking the Open Action Center link in the message box, you can make the changes that are recommended or (for example, in the case where you have an antivirus program installed but Windows doesn’t recognize it), you can select the option to turn off messages regarding that application, as shown in Figure C.

Figure C

8: Side-by-side windows auto-size

Most of the monitors sold today come in a wide aspect ratio that’s better for watching movies, which is also handy for displaying two documents side by side on the screen. With Vista, though, you have to manually size those docs. Windows 7 has a cool new feature by which you can drag windows to each side of the screen and they will automatically size themselves to each take up half the screen when you let go of the cursor.

Even better, if you drag the window back away from the edge, it goes back to the size it was before. How cool is that?

9: Home networking gets simple

For home users without a lot technical know-how, networking has been made simpler in Windows 7. A new feature called HomeGroup allows all Windows 7 computers on a network to share files, printers, and other resources more easily. Thanks to Libraries (collections of certain types of files, such as music, photos, or documents), you can access files anywhere on the HomeGroup network as if they were stored locally, and you can search across the whole HomeGroup.

Windows Media Player in Windows 7 can stream the music and videos on one PC in the network to another, and even play back songs from iTunes libraries on other computers.

Connecting to a wireless network is also easier; now you can click the wi-fi icon in the system tray and select a network from the list, instead of opening up a separate dialog box to make the connection.

10: Taskbar preview really works

In Vista, you can hover over a taskbar button — for Internet Explorer, for example — and see that three instances of IE are open. You see the open pages stacked as shown in Figure D, but they’re so small that it’s difficult to really tell which page is which.

Figure D

The Vista taskbar preview gives you an idea of what your running application windows contain.

In Windows 7, the preview feature has been enhanced so that it becomes an extremely useful function. Now when you hover over a taskbar icon, you get actual previews that are placed side by side and are large enough for you to identify (Figure E).

Figure E

In Windows 7, you can actually tell what’s in each of those preview windows.

And that’s not all. If you’re playing a video in one of the windows, that video plays in the preview window, too. And if you right-click the IE icon in the taskbar, you get a list of your IE history files, as shown in Figure F. You can just click any of those and go immediately to that page.

Figure F

Right-clicking the taskbar icon gives you more options; in the case of IE, you can select from the history files, open a new instance of the browser, unpin the program, or close the window.